37
46
4
8
20
33
49
15
47
25
44
3
5
14
22
40
26
38
34
2
29
50
11
32
35
39
48
16
24
31
43
10
30
13
7
23
18
21
1
45
9

Key Considerations in Buying or Selling a Business in Zimbabwe

KELVIN SABAO

 

Introduction

 

Buying or selling a business is a significant undertaking that involves various legal intricacies. Whether you are an entrepreneur looking to sell your business or an aspiring business owner eager to make a strategic acquisition, it is crucial to navigate the legal landscape carefully. This article will delve into the key legal aspects to consider when embarking on the journey of buying or selling a business.

 

  1. Due Diligence

 

Before entering into any business transaction, thorough due diligence is paramount. This process involves a comprehensive examination of the business’s legal, financial, and operational aspects. Legal due diligence ensures that there are no hidden liabilities, pending litigations, or regulatory compliance issues that could impact the deal. Buyers should scrutinize contracts, intellectual property, employee agreements, and other legal documents, while sellers should ensure all necessary disclosures are made transparently.

 

  1. Structure of the Transaction

 

The structure of the deal can significantly impact the legal obligations of both parties. Common structures include asset purchase agreements and share purchase agreements. Asset purchases involve acquiring specific assets, allowing buyers to pick and choose what they want. These assets may include equipment, inventory, intellectual property, contracts, and goodwill. Whereas, share purchases, on the other hand, involve acquiring the entire shareholding of a business entity, including its liabilities. This means the buyer assumes ownership of all assets, liabilities, and obligations of the company, including potential undisclosed liabilities. Each structure has unique legal implications, affecting issues such as taxes, liabilities, and contractual obligations.

 

  1. Contracts

 

Contracts play a pivotal role in a business transaction. Sellers must ensure that all contracts, including client agreements, vendor contracts, and employment agreements, are in order and assignable. Buyers, on the other hand, need to carefully review existing contracts to identify any potential risks or liabilities. A well-drafted purchase agreement should outline the terms of the deal, including price, payment structure, and any contingencies.

 

  1. Regulatory Compliance

 

Compliance with laws and regulations is critical in a business transaction. Sellers must ensure that the business adheres to all applicable laws and regulations, such as environmental regulations, licensing requirements, and employment laws. Buyers should thoroughly investigate regulatory compliance to avoid inheriting any legal issues. Engaging legal counsel with expertise in the specific industry is crucial to navigating the complex regulatory landscape.

 

  1. Intellectual Property

 

Intellectual property (IP) is often a valuable asset in a business transaction. Sellers should confirm whether they own or have the right to use all relevant IP, including trademarks, patents, copyrights, and trade secrets. Buyers should assess the strength and validity of the target company’s IP portfolio and ensure that appropriate assignments and licenses are in place. Failing to address IP issues can lead to costly legal disputes post-transaction.

 

  1. Employee Considerations

 

In a business sale, employee-related matters must be carefully managed. Sellers should communicate the impending sale to employees transparently and address any employment contracts, non-compete agreements, or benefit plans. Buyers need to assess the workforce and determine the impact of the transaction on existing employees, including potential redundancies or changes in employment terms. Buyers should take note of the labour laws that govern the transfer of business undertakings as a going concern. According to section 16 of the Labour Act [Chapter 28:01], any business undertaking in which any persons are employed is alienated or transferred in any way whatsoever, the employment of such persons shall, unless otherwise lawfully terminated, be deemed to be transferred to the transferee (buyer) of the undertaking on terms and conditions which are not less favourable than those which applied immediately before the transfer, and the continuity of employment of such employees shall be deemed not to have been interrupted.

 

Conclusion

 

Navigating the legal aspects of buying or selling a business requires careful attention to detail and expert guidance. Engaging experienced legal professionals is essential to ensure that the transaction is conducted smoothly and that both parties are protected. By addressing due diligence, transaction structure, contracts, regulatory compliance, intellectual property, and employee considerations, businesses can minimize legal risks and set the stage for a successful and legally sound business transaction.

 

Disclaimer:

The information and opinions expressed above are for general information only. They are not intended to constitute legal or other professional advice.

 

Kelvin Sabao (LLB LLM Corporate Law (Unisa) is a duly registered Legal Practitioner practising law at Titan Law. He writes in his personal capacity. He is a co-author of a book titled ‘The Directors’ Handbook in Zimbabwe’. This publication underscores his expertise and dedication to advancing the knowledge and understanding of corporate law and corporate governance in the Zimbabwean context. For more information, you can contact Kelvin via email at: [email protected]

 


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